Proposals/Abstracts



The submission period for proposals/abstracts has closed.

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The organizers of the 2020 SBCC Summit wish to invite proposals/abstracts for innovative presentations and sessions that address the three unique but interrelated themes of the event:

  1. Catalyzing Transformational Change around some of the world's most pressing challenges including poverty, gender equality, protecting the planet and ensuring that all people enjoy health, peace and prosperity
  2. Future Forward to learn from programs and research that reveal new challenges, innovations and methodologies that advance the field
  3. Connecting the Dots between diverse partners, across development sectors and disciplines, to create collective action and impact at various levels from individuals to whole societies

Youth, those ages 18 to 29, represent the future of our field and the world and are particularly encouraged to submit proposals.In addition to the themes, the organizing committee has identified seven session formats that submitters may consider when preparing their proposals:

  1. Oral Presentation
  2. Poster Presentation
  3. Preformed Panel 
  4. Multimedia Showcase
  5. Skills Building Workshop
  6. Comm Talk
  7. Blue Sky Session

The DEADLINE for submissions is Nov. 11 5 p.m. EST.  

If you have an idea to propose for the Summit and would like additional guidance to support your submission, please send an email to info@sbccsummit.org with a brief summary statement or review our proposal/abstract FAQs here. The Summit organizers will work to connect you appropriately.

NOTE: The software allows you to save your work as you go. When you would like to save, click the "Save & Submit Later" button. When you log back in, you can return to where you left off in the proposal/abstract submission form. When you are ready to submit, click on the Submit button. No changes are allowed once you click on the Submit button.

Proposal/Abstract Submission Guidelines

The organizers of the 2020 SBCC Summit wish to invite proposals for innovative presentations and sessions that address the three unique but interrelated themes of the event:

  1. Catalyzing Transformational Change around some of the world's most pressing challenges including poverty, gender equality, protecting the planet and ensuring that all people enjoy health, peace and prosperity
  2. Future Forward to learn from programs and research that reveal new challenges, innovations and methodologies that advance the field
  3. Connecting the Dots between diverse partners, across development sectors and disciplines, to create collective action and impact at various levels from individuals to whole societies

Youth, those ages 18 to 29, represent the future of our field and the world and are particularly encouraged to submit proposals

In addition to the themes, the organizing committee has identified seven session formats that submitters may consider when preparing their proposals: Oral Presentation, Poster Presentation, Preformed Panel, Multimedia Showcase, Skills Building Workshop, Comm Talk, and Blue Sky Session. Within each of these formats, submitters are encouraged to think creatively about how their proposals can best engage Summit participants to think critically, share knowledge and experience, learn from each other and shape the future of SBCC. These formats and some innovative variations are described in greater detail in the third section of this Call for Proposals.

We accept proposals from: NGOs, government agencies, the private sector, scholars, students, practitioners, program managers, artists, writers and producers, the not-for-profit sector and social enterprises - in other words, anyone interested in SBCC.

Feel free to submit as many proposals as you like, but know that in the interest of achieving the broadest possible representation and participation in the Summit, the Program Sub-Committee will not select more than two submissions from any one person as lead author or session organizer. The DEADLINE for submissions is  Nov. 11 5 p.m. EST. The online submission form can be found here.

General Directions for Submissions

Proposals will be submitted online and may be written in English, French or Spanish. Please note that webinars will be available in all three languages to help submitters prepare their proposals. Look for further notice about these webinars soon on the Summit website.
In selecting proposals for the Summit program, the Program Sub-Committee will take the following general criteria into consideration:

  1. Alignment with conference themes (see below)
  2. Relevance to SBCC programs and importance to the field
  3. Clarity of content
  4. Soundness of the conclusions or perspectives offered
  5. Ability of the proposal to result in new insights, perspectives and/or partnerships for the SBCC field.
  6. Potential for audience experience/knowledge sharing, skills building, discussion/debate
  7. Appropriateness of the proposed format for the proposed content
  8. Level of facilitation required to make the proposal successful

Summit Themes


Each proposal should address one of the main Summit themes, described below. Submitters will be asked to identify the relevant theme on the online submission form.

Theme 1: "Catalyzing Transformational Change"

Proposals submitted under this theme will examine the most recent evidence and innovations from the SBCC field, build on our diverse methodologies, encourage debate about our way forward and highlight successes and challenges. They will explore the enormous potential of our collective strengths and the diversity of our field – across disciplines, development priorities and geographies – to address the full range of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), including but not limited to climate action, gender discrimination and violence, health and well-being, poverty reduction, sustainable consumption, reduced inequality and access to justice. A major goal of the Summit is to help accelerate action towards achievement of all the SDGs.

Proposals under this theme may also draw from an array of disciplines, including communication, psychology, anthropology, sociology, media development, neuroscience, behavioral economics, human centered design, market science, community engagement, participatory media, social marketing and advocacy, among others. In preparing their proposals, submitters should highlight the conceptual thinking, frameworks and models that underpin programming and/or research design decisions, the steps taken to ensure the quality and rigor of the approaches used, and how the work is both evidence-based and innovative.

Examples of other topics under this theme include such things as:

  • Underlying catalysts – and barriers – for change;
  • Lessons learned that expand the boundaries and effectiveness of SBCC approaches;
  • Linkages between SBCC, structural determinants, solutions and outcomes;
  • How SBCC supports social movements and social justice initiatives;
  • Nurturing new voices for change and building participatory dialogue around transformational change, particularly among young people.


In addition to thematic appropriateness, the Program Sub-Committee will prioritize proposals that match the following criteria:

  1. The degree to which evidence is effectively used to support arguments, draw conclusions and make recommendations
  2. Potential of the proposal to expand and/or advance thinking about SBCC practice, approaches, theories, research, equity, sustainability and engagement


Theme 2: "Future Forward"

In an increasingly interconnected age, the ways in which people engage with each other, access information and "see" the world are evolving rapidly. Communication habits are being transformed with increased access to mobile technologies, social media and private messaging. Technologies such as artificial intelligence, augmented and virtual reality and voice assistance are offering new ways to understand audiences and develop personalized and immersive content. With these transformations, what new opportunities and challenges for SBCC emerge? How is our ability to understand and engage with people and facilitate change affected? How are social participation and democratic processes affected? And what does all this mean for the roughly 40 percent of the world's population not connected to the Internet? How are we ensuring that we 'leave no one behind', especially marginalized and vulnerable communities?

With increased digitization and ease of information exchange, misinformation can spread rapidly, challenging democratic processes, causing harm to individuals and communities and undermining fact-based discourse around critical social and development issues. How can SBCC support people's ability to access accurate information and build information literacy skills needed to navigate today's complex communication environments and to identify and challenge misinformation? What challenges do we face in establishing trust and how do we address them?

Alongside these shifts, thinking about 'what works' in SBCC is constantly evolving. Are there new understandings about 'how change happens' that are effectively shaping our work? What new methodologies can be used to understand and quantify social impact? How can we ensure that we are continually learning and adapting our practices based on evidence?

These trends only underscore the need for a strong code of ethics for the SBCC field. What ethics guide us? How are these challenged and how are they evolving in a digital age? How can we ensure we are accountable to each other and to the communities we work with? How does our work engage with traditional cultures and practices? What efforts are underway to develop a shared code of ethics for our field?

Examples of other topics under this theme include such things as:

  • How new technologies, innovations and digital tools are being used for SBCC, how they complement existing SBCC approaches, and pitfalls and challenges faced in using them.
  • Measuring the impact of new technologies: how do these innovations help shape participation, political and social processes, behaviors and norms; what evidence exists to optimize the use of new technologies for SBCC; how do we use new methodologies to understand and quantify impact; what is the impact of user privacy issues on research and learning.
  • The impact of recent developments in SBCC theory and methodology on programming and efforts to adapt practices based on new learning and evidence;
  • Discussion of SBCC ethics on topics including accountability to ourselves and the communities we work with, audience profiling and data safety and prospects for developing an SBCC code of ethics.


In addition to thematic appropriateness, the Program Sub-Committee will prioritize proposals that match the following criteria:

  1. Potential to share novel insights from formative studies or evaluations that can strengthen SBCC practice.
  2. Potential to draw attention to ethical issues within the SBCC sector.


Theme 3: "Connecting The Dots"

Reflecting on the strength and diversity of the SBCC community, this theme will explore ways to further increase collaboration, share skills and build capacity, as well as foster collective action within the field across different sectors, geographies, disciplines stakeholder groups (donors, government, academic, practitioners, private sector, networks, etc.) and generations (adults and youth).

For example, the private sector is investing billions in the development sector but not always in concert with other stakeholder groups. Academia is cultivating some of the newest and most innovative research both in terms of methods used and data being unearthed to better understand and inform programming, but does not always collaborate on research with programs and practitioners. Public interest and advocacy groups are building capacity to promote just and equitable livelihoods but are not always aware of what is happening beyond their own sector. Public health practitioners are exploring and implementing programs to bring about transformational change and to help marginalized groups develop their own solutions to health and well-being, but these practitioners do not always have access to the latest evidence, methods and tools for optimizing success. And governments, private foundations and donors are investing in and developing policies and strategies to help guide better programming for sustainable change, but do not always engage directly with the publics that benefit from those programs.

In addition, SBCC addresses and operates across all layers of systems and society, and aims to increase knowledge, change attitudes, enhance skills and shift societal norms (when appropriate) to promote social, structural and individual change. But the way it is deployed across levels of social ecology is not always systematically conceptualized. SBCC is a transformative process of social engagement, reflection and practice that works on multiple levels: individual behavior and practices; collective action by families, communities and peer networks; social and cultural institutions; and an enabling political, legal and regulatory environment. It also deploys a vast variety of media – from mass media, to social mobilization, interpersonal communication, advocacy and policy change. How can we improve synthesis and coordination?

Examples of other topics under this theme include such things as:

  • Exploring how varying disciplines in SBCC connect, overlap and/or reinforce one another and how this can be leveraged for greater impact;
  • Establishing partnerships and collaboration for those outside of the SBCC field and the lessons learned in doing so;
  • Creating tools and approaches that foster collaboration, shared agenda setting and collective action;
  • Building partnerships among SBCC stakeholders;
  • Building on, not repeating, what's already been done in the field;
  • Building the capacity of practitioners working in development-related fields;
  • Engaging non-traditional players/sectors;
  • Bridging the gap between academics and practitioners.


In addition to thematic appropriateness, the Program Sub-Committee will prioritize proposals that match the following criteria:

  1. Degree to which the proposal highlights opportunities for co-design among stakeholders within programmatic structures
  2. Novel approaches to formative research and evaluation that build on existing evidence and existing program integration


SESSION FORMATS/TYPES

(1) Oral and Poster Presentations

Proposals accepted for Oral Presentation will be grouped by the Program Sub-Committee, according to theme, and organized into panel sessions with an underlying or unifying focus, similar approaches or other interesting linkages. In each Oral Presentation session, 3-4 presenters will have approximately 10-12 minutes to present followed by a period of discussion with the audience.

Posters will be presented within an exhibition space at various designated days and times during the Summit. Technology will be available for the display of digital posters. More details about the digital technology will be available soon on the Summit website.

Submitters may indicate their preference for an Oral Presentation or a Poster Presentation (digital or non-digital). Depending on the volume of submissions, the Program Sub-committee may not be able to honor all preferences; some proposals not accepted for Oral Presentation may be considered for Poster Presentation, with the agreement of the submitter.

Proposals for Oral Presentations and Poster Presentations may be research-oriented, practice-oriented or both. Submitters should indicate in the online submission form how they envision the research- or practice-orientation of their proposal and justify that characterization.

Practice-oriented proposals will be reviewed against these additional criteria:

  1. How clearly does the proposal define recommendations based on the program experience?
  2. How well does the proposal explain the evidence used to inform program strategy?
  3. How well do program activities match the strategy?
  4. How much potential is there for replication?
  5. How well are conclusions supported by monitoring and/or evaluation of some kind?

Research-oriented proposals will be reviewed against these additional criteria:

  1. How clearly does the proposal describe the direct impact of a strategy on a specified development issue or outcome?
  2. How well grounded is the proposal in the use of a broadly accepted research methodology?
  3. How well is the research question stated in an answerable form?
  4. To what extent does literature or previous evidence provide a basis for the research?
  5. How rigorous and appropriate is the design for answering the research question(s)?
  6. How rigorous is the analysis and how well does it address the research question?
  7. To what extent are the conclusions consistent with the analytical approach

The online submission form will use the following structure for Oral/Poster Proposal Submissions:


Title of proposal/abstract
Summary (up to 250 words)
Background/objectives (up to 100 words)
For practice-oriented proposals: Description of intervention (up to 150 words)
For research-oriented proposals: Description of methods/design (up to 150 words)
Results/lessons learned (up to 150 words)
Discussion/implications for the field (up to 100 words)
Authors and affiliation


(2) Preformed Panel Presentations

A group of 3-4 related proposals may be submitted together as a pre-formed panel session reflecting a common issue, topic, challenge or question of interest. The related proposals may or may not all relate to a single program, but the submitter (representing all the linked proposals collectively) should make a strong case for why the proposals should be considered together as a preformed session.

PLEASE NOTE: A single panel coordinator will submit the information for all presenters/contributions in the proposed panel.

Submitters are encouraged to be creative in how this preformed session is structured to ensure maximum opportunity for audience engagement and learning. For example, Preformed Panel submitters may propose presentations followed by a panel discussion, a debate format, a "speed dating" format with multiple simultaneous presentations or other creative ways to engage the audience in idea exchange and learning. Please note that due to space limitations, only a limited number of Preformed Panels can be scheduled for the program, so selection for these slots will be highly competitive. A proposal for a preformed session that is primarily focused on skills building should be submitted under the Skills-Building Workshop format (see below).

Proposals for Preformed Panels may be research-oriented, practice-oriented or both. Submitters should indicate in the online submission form whether their proposal is research-oriented, program-oriented or both and explain why.

Practice-oriented proposals will be reviewed against these additional criteria :

  1. Does the proposal define clear recommendations based on the program experience?
  2. Does the proposal explain how evidence was used to inform program strategy?
  3. Do program activities match the strategy?
  4. Is there potential for replication?
  5. Was there any monitoring or evaluation?


Research-oriented proposals will be reviewed against these additional criteria:

  1. Does the proposal describe the direct impact of a social change, behavior change, communication for development and/or media development strategy on a specified development issue?
  2. Does the proposal describe use of an established and broadly accepted research methodology?
  3. Is the research question stated in an answerable form?
  4. Does literature or previous evidence provide a basis for the research?
  5. Is the design rigorous and appropriate for answering the research question?
  6. Is the analysis rigorous and does it address the research question?
  7. Are the conclusions consistent with the analytical approach?


The online submission form will use the following structure for Preformed Panel Proposal Submissions (please note that submissions in this category have two parts):


(Part A) Panel Overview

Title
Theme
Please indicate if your proposal/abstract is research-oriented, practice-oriented or both. (For multimedia, please select practice-oriented)
Panel objectives: Main issue/theme addressed across presenters (up to 250 words)
Panel structure: How do multiple perspectives develop the theme? How will synthesis be achieved through the structure of the session? (up to 200 words)
Panel implications/importance: How will the panel, overall, advance the field? (up to 100 words)

(Part B) Individual Panel Contributions

Title
Please indicate if your proposal/abstract is research-oriented, practice-oriented or both. (For multimedia, please select practice-oriented)
Background/Objectives related to the panel theme (up to 100 words)
Approaches/methods (up to 150 words)
Results (up to 150 words)
Conclusion/contributions to panel theme (up to 100 words)

(3) Skills-Building Workshops

Skills-Building Workshops will provide participants with the opportunity to develop new and strengthen existing skills in a variety of SBCC areas including, but not limited to, research, communication channels, advocacy, program planning, program design, program implementation, monitoring and evaluation, theories and approaches. Length of the workshop: two hours.

Submitters are encouraged to think creatively about workshop formats that are structured to ensure maximum opportunity for audience engagement, interactivity and learning. Rather than just didactic teaching approaches, submitters under this category might propose any number of innovative learning approaches: hands-on practice, experiential learning, learning by doing, group work, and others.

The online submission form will use the following structure for Skills-Building Workshop Proposal Submissions:

Title of proposal/abstract
Summary (up to 250 words)
Learning objectives for participants (up to 100 words)
Description of skills building activity approach and methods (up to 350 words)
Discussion/implications for the field (up to 100 words)
Authors and affiliation

(4) Multimedia Showcase

Multimedia Showcases will provide a forum that features listening, viewing and/or interacting with multimedia products or materials used in SBCC programs, including entertainment-education. Media might include film, television, social media videos, mobile platforms, music, radio, animation, comics, transmedia, virtual reality, interactive websites or other formats. Live performance or theater will also be considered. Submissions for the Multimedia Showcases should exemplify the diversity, the power and the impact of SBCC. Abstracts submitted that are not primarily focused on a multimedia product itself (its design, content or use in a program) should instead be submitted under the Oral Presentation format. Each multimedia proposal will be assigned by the Program Sub-Committee to a specific 90-minute multimedia-focused panel session, based on topic/content areas (to be determined). During these sessions, each presenter will be given approximately 15 minutes to introduce, screen and briefly contextualize the product in a short presentation. Within that 15-minute timeframe, the presenter will be able to showcase up to seven minutes of their multimedia product during the panel discussion. If there are any multimedia products that are more than seven minutes in length, we highly recommend that the presenter prepare/edit a shorter version of the same, that can be used for screening during the panel discussion.

In addition to the Multimedia Showcase panel sessions, a limited number of audio/visual multimedia products, which are longer than 7 minutes, may be given an Extended Screening in an assigned multimedia room. Extended Screening time may not exceed 120 minutes. This would include one to two minutes for the presenter to introduce the film before screening and up to 15 minutes for post-screening discussion. Submitters will have the option of indicating whether their abstract should be considered for a Multimedia Showcase session, an Extended Screening, or both during the online submission process.

The proposal must include a digital link to the featured media product. All submissions should be dubbed or subtitled if the audio is in a language other than English.

The online submission form will use the following structure for MULTIMEDIA SHOWCASE Proposal Submissions:

Name of proposal/abstract
Summary (up to 250 words)
Name of the presentation (if different from the multimedia product)
Duration of the submission
Background/objectives (up to 100 words)
Description of multimedia (up to 150 words)
Results/lessons learned (up to 150 words)
Discussion/implications for the field (up to 100 words)
Link to an online version of the product
Check box for submission to A) Panel Session, B) Extended Screening or C) Both
Authors and affiliation

 (5) Comm Talk 

Structured like a TED Talk, Comm Talks will provide a platform for one speaker to showcase well-formed ideas or share personal experiences or insights in 10 minutes or less. The topic should be something new or surprising, a challenge to the status quo or a compelling new argument to a well-established and accepted idea. Comm Talks should be presented as a narrative, rather than in a formal or academic delivery format. Individuals selected to give a Comm Talk will be required to complete at least one rehearsal session (via Skype or in person) with a representative from the selection committee prior to the event. Selected Comm Talks will be recorded and posted on the event website and other platforms, so others may participate in the session virtually.

The online submission form will use the following structure for Comm Talks Proposal/Abstract Submissions:

Title of proposal/abstract
Summary (up to 250 words)
Background/objectives of the talk (up to 100 words)
Description of the big idea/experience/innovation and its importance to the SBCC field (up to 200 words)
Structure of the talk (up to 100 words)
Discussion/implications for the field (up to 100 words)
Authors and affiliation


(6) Blue Sky Sessions

Blue Sky sessions aim to provide an open forum for "outside the box" group discussion about a topic or issue that is emerging, has potentially important implications for research and/or practice in the field of SBCC, but for which evidence may not yet be available.

Similar to a Preformed Panel, these Blue Sky sessions would bring together 4-5 people who have been thinking about/struggling with/trying to develop approaches to the topic or issue. Unlike a Preformed Panel, each speaker will provide only a brief, provocative 2-3 minute statement about their thinking and unanswered questions related to the topic or issue, then engage each other (and the audience) in discussion/debate about those questions. No slide presentations or materials will be shared, only ideas and questions expressed orally.

PLEASE NOTE: A single session coordinator will submit the information for all presenters/contributions in the proposed Blue Sky session.

Topics should address conceptual, political, practical or research issues that push the boundaries of what is currently known A Blue Sky session should aim to provoke a breakthrough in thinking that could lead to new directions for program practice, policy, theorizing or research, including new ways of thinking about conceptual, methodological or practical puzzles that have so far eluded resolution; or novel concepts or perspectives that put an issue into a new light or simply draw attention to something curious that has potential to be game changing for some aspect of SBCC.

Submitters interested in proposing a Blue Sky session should think outside of their own circle of acquaintances, identify 4-5 people in the SBCC community who are likely to have interesting things to say about the topic, explore with each member of the group how s/he might approach the topic, and confirm their willingness to participate - before writing and submitting the abstract proposal. Submitters should consider the value of inviting a group of people with shared interests who are not already collaborators.

The online submission form will use the following structure for Blue Sky Proposal Submissions:

Title of proposal/abstract
Summary (up to 250 words)
Description of the emerging/novel topic or issue (up to 200 words)
Description of how speakers represent different perspectives on the topic/issue that will challenge each other and the audience (up to 200 words)
Discussion/Implication for the Field (up to 100 words)